Give us a call: (214) 632-2036
Categories
Uncategorized

Perpetual threats to our water quality require constant vigilance.

Improved water quality is the chief reason health and longevity of the population has improved over the last 100 years, in the U.S.

Problem: Perpetual threats to our water quality require constant vigilance.

Improved water quality is the chief reason health and longevity of the population has improved over the last 100 years, in the U.S.  This progress has been achieved through varied approaches, such water treatment, governmental agency regulations and oversight, research, and testing of water quality, to name a few.  However, constant vigilance is required to maintain safe water sources, water treatment, water storage and drinking water systems.

Threats to our water quality comes from aging, outdated drinking water systems where faulty pipes, water main breaks, and other age-related issues allow for germs and chemicals to enter the water supply.  The cost to repair and bring these drinking water systems up-to-date, to meet growing population demands, is estimated to be $1 trillion, over the next 25 years, so serious is the problem.  Climate change and warming temperatures also cause contamination of the water supply through waterborne diseases.  Challenges to water safety abound in the U.S.  As drinking water systems in the U.S. age, broken pipes, water main breaks, and other age-related issues increase the chances for germs or chemicals to enter the water.  Heavy dependence on treating water chemically becomes important to kill disease-causing contaminants for public health safety. 

Protecting our original water sources, such as water treatment plants, storage tanks, and drinking water distribution systems that carry water to our homes, is an ongoing challenge over-seen by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that regulates drinking water quality in public water systems.  In addition, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has an Environmental Public Health Tracking Network that tracks and stores data regarding the most common environmental chemicals found in community water systems.  Meanwhile, the CDC confronts “. . . drinking water challenges through its water-related research, prevention, and policy activities, and programs.”

Organika’s Solution: 

Organika Rainwater has zero manmade toxins and contaminants.  Organika Rainwater has perfected a catchment system, which surpasses standards for the strictest commercial distribution. Rainwater is collected at “altitude” (meaning it goes a distance above ground, away from any manmade environmental toxins and contaminations). 

Read more from the CDC in their article, “Drinking Water Week.” 

https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/drinking-water-week.html

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *